How To Deal With Burnout With Agile Sprints

How To Deal With Burnout With Agile Sprints
How To Deal With Burnout With Agile Sprints

Video: How To Deal With Burnout With Agile Sprints

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This is Tony Schwartz's energy quadrants. The vertical axis shows the amount of energy, the horizontal axis shows the quality. Efficiency. In the first zone, we are physically and emotionally uplifted. We are filled, energized and focused on the task that inspires us. We feel that our life is as productive and fulfilling as possible. We enter the second zone when, in the presence of a reserve of physical and emotional strength, we temporarily find ourselves in a stressful situation. These can be conflicts or tough deadlines. The third zone is a consequence of being in the second zone for too long. We run out of physical and emotional energy and we lose the ability to act and enjoy life. The fourth zone is the zone of recharging and relaxation: rest, time spent alone with oneself, in nature or with loved ones. Here we are charged with positiveness and energy. The optimal mode provides cycles of effective work, which are accompanied by cycles of rest. Temporary exit from the comfort zone (being in zone 2 - survival) can temper us and become a growth point, provided that we do not slide into burnout. for long term stress. After being in zone 2 for a short time, it is important to recover. Most people, setting ambitious goals for themselves, find themselves in the zone of survival. The pursuit with a whip and motivational trainings of the “pull yourself together, rag” format only push us deeper into the third zone, which is not easy to get out of. My story For as long as I can remember, I ran ahead of the locomotive and strove for “successful success” at any cost. I became interested in the topic of productivity and time management as a child: I independently organized three external studies at school and at the age of 14 I studied at the institute. At 16 I founded my first business, at the age of 19, having received three degrees in the best universities in Russia, I ended up in the famous Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and moved to Boston. There, in parallel with the double norm of courses and additional studies at Harvard, I decided to found my first technology startup. So 9 years ago, I drove myself into a dead end in an effort to prove to myself, my parents and the world that I am worth something. I took out a loan from myself, and it was time to pay the bills. Burnout is the result of the pursuit of success. Burnout It is not easy to notice burnout in the early stages. This is because the body's initial response to prolonged stress contradicts stereotypes about a burnt-out person. We go through several stages: Superoptimist. Often, at the first stage of burnout, we set ourselves unrealistic global goals and fall in love with the image of our new self. The "first bells" appear - slight excitability and inability to focus attention. Usually, the dopamine shower of the first stage lasts for several days, after which the understanding comes that the forces are running out, and the new life is still far beyond the horizon. Innovator. In the second stage, we decide in a panic that we need to change the methods. We start looking for new courses and trainings, buy books, sign up for the gym and take classes with a coach. This gives a new short-term surge in dopamine. Attorney. When we understand that innovations have not changed life for the better, hope for change, the ability to see the future and the ability to set goals are lost. The search for the guilty begins. Indignation and criticism of others give a short-term burst of energy. We start to avoid people because their successes and positivity annoy. Zombies. In the fourth stage, complete emotional and physical exhaustion sets in.There is simply no strength to do anything, even the simplest tasks require incredible efforts, and from the thought of the upcoming affairs begins to stir up. We are sliding down to the level of basic routine actions, we live on autopilot. Work, the people around me, life in general are disgusting. I am not the only victim of ambitious goals and "good advice" according to which success goes only to those who work without sleep and rest, not sparing themselves. But if you think about it, this idea just doesn't make sense. Perpetual motion machines do not exist. No matter how effective and pumped you are, you need regular rest and recovery. The new Tesla accelerates to a hundred in two seconds, but if it is not charged, it will lose on the track to a tricycle. Cycles and sprints The bottom, where I found myself 9 years ago, became a fulcrum for me. Over the years, I have developed an approach to organizing life, which I call Agile life. The approach is based on the principles of neurophysiology, a system of self-coaching and agile sprints - short time periods of work on a group of goals. Each sprint, I choose three goals in three areas - developing personal potential, strengthening the social cocoon and career growth. Next, for three weeks I will focus on their implementation. At the end of the sprint, I conduct a performance analysis session, record achievements and lessons learned, and then arrange a recovery week. Then the cycle is repeated. You can complete 12 sprints in a year; all elements of the sprint cycle are summed up in the abbreviation PEAR. Plan Execute Analyze Relax Pear is a perfect metaphor for a life of meaning, energy, and joy. Life Changes When I built this approach into my life, a lot has changed in it. … I began to devote more time to myself, family and friends. Traveled half the world. I learned to cook borscht and got a puppy. I stopped working all day long, but the pace of my career only increased. At 23, I sold my startup to an aerospace company with an office in Silicon Valley, taking over as vice president. At 26, I started investing in startups, and at 27, I wrote my first book, Just Cosmos. I became convinced that long-term success and life balance go hand in hand. You don't have to whip yourself to get things done and move forward; I advise you to abandon long-term ambitious goals and the whip method. It is worth moving in stages, regularly checking yourself. This way you can achieve more. Remember Darwin - it is not the fittest who survives, but the one who is able to adapt to changing environmental conditions faster than others. Sprints help you quickly adapt and stay in touch with yourself. Here's another quote. This time - Benjamin Franklin: "Human well-being is generated not by great successes, which rarely happen, but by small successes that we achieve every day." Give up ambitious goals that lead to a burnout dead end. Start your first sprint today. Read more about the book Katerina Lengold Agile life "How to take life into a new orbit using agile planning methods, neurophysiology and self-coaching" The agile life method involves a step-by-step movement towards goals without violence and is based on the latest research in neurophysiology self-coaching techniques and the use of cyclic agile sprints. The book is an excellent self-coaching tool, includes dozens of practical exercises, a step-by-step action plan and a motivational kick to start the movement towards a productive and balanced life. See also: How to manage projects in your personal life: 3 project tips 12 new products of November "Alpiny non-fiction" How to understand that you are not aware of your personal boundaries

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