The Doctor Diagnoses Fairy-tale Characters: What Is Wrong With Little Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty And Pinocchio?

The Doctor Diagnoses Fairy-tale Characters: What Is Wrong With Little Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty And Pinocchio?
The Doctor Diagnoses Fairy-tale Characters: What Is Wrong With Little Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty And Pinocchio?

Video: The Doctor Diagnoses Fairy-tale Characters: What Is Wrong With Little Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty And Pinocchio?

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Video: Hansel & Gretel Fairy Tales for Kids +More Stories Pinocchio, Lion King, The hunchback of notre dame 2023, February
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Our culture presents an abundance of fairy tales. Fairy tales have performed and continue to perform certain functions - they help to entertain children, and sometimes even teach them. Often, the authors of fairy tales included in the narrative very peculiar characters, for whose behavior very specific medical terms are known today. And some behavioral disorders are even named after certain characters. Australian physician John Messi published an article about his medical discoveries in fabulous literature in the periodical Journal of Pediatrics and Child Health, and we publish for you an abridged translation of this text. "Rapunzel" The Brothers Grimm, 1812 As you know, Rapunzel was locked in a tower and waited when prince charming rescues her. She grew her hair so long that the prince could climb it to his beloved. Today, doctors call Rapunzel Syndrome an extreme accumulation of hair in the intestines - in a disorder such as trichophagia, a person pulls out their own hair and then eats it, which can even be fatal if the hairball (trichobezoar) is not removed from the intestine in time. beauty "Giambattista Basile, 1634 A beautiful princess pricked her finger on the spindle, and now she is cursed: she will sleep for a hundred years and will only wake up if she is kissed by an extraordinary prince. It is possible that the princess contracted African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness. Most often, this ailment was caused by the bite of an infected tsetse fly, but could also be transmitted through the exchange of physiological fluids (since the tale is European, this is the most likely method of transmission). "Little Red Riding Hood" Version of the Brothers Grimm, 1812 Mom sends Take Little Red Riding Hood to the sick grandmother. Most likely, the girl had serious visual impairments - myopia or astigmatism (or both) - if she did not notice that her grandmother looked like a wolf. Although it is likely that the grandmother herself also suffered from lupus erythematosus. According to another version, the grandmother could have been diagnosed with hypertrichosis, a disorder in which excessive hair growth occurs on the body and face. And perhaps that is why the grandmother did not want to show herself to people and hid on the side of the forest. In my grandmother's medical record, other diagnoses could well have been recorded: exophthalmos (“grandmother, why do you have such big eyes?”) And a pituitary tumor with a symptom in the form of swollen hands (“grandmother, why do you have such big hands?”). so long ago, Red Riding Hood syndrome began to be called excessive naivety and cognitive dissonance, as evidenced by the very strange inability to recognize the wolf in the heroine herself. But some people use the term to refer to the reckless dating on the Internet. It is also used in the community of HIV-positive people to refer to unsafe sexual practices with a naive attitude like “this will never happen to me.” “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” Version by the Brothers Grimm, 1812 In this classic tale about a girl who had to hide in forest from the wrath of an evil stepmother, heroes can also be diagnosed with a number of diagnoses. Snow White's pallor may be a reference to albinism, and the dwarves clearly suffered from achondroplasia.Snow White could faint because a piece of apple got stuck in her throat, or the apple was badly washed, and she got a severe form of listeriosis and fell into a coma. "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" The English analogue of the fairy tale "Masha and the Bears" The girl accidentally finds in the house of bears in the forest, enters it, eats bear porridge, breaks the chair of one of the bears and falls asleep on the bear's bed. The girl clearly has Kleine-Levin syndrome, in which patients sleep most of the day and wake up only to eat. Goldilocks may have broken her stool due to the excess weight gained from this regimen. Sometimes Kleine-Levin syndrome is also used to explain the behavior of Snow White and Sleeping Beauty, but they did not suffer from hyperphagia (that is, increased appetite). According to another version, the girl could have been diagnosed with the genetic Prader-Willie syndrome, characterized by a combination of increased appetite and mental retardation. "Alice in Wonderland" Lewis Carroll, 1865 Alice falls into a rabbit hole and incredible events begin to happen to her. Alice has a rather distorted perception of time, space, distance and dimension. Perhaps the girl had a brain tumor or multiple migraines - or her condition was altered due to the use of some kind of medication. Neurologists today call Alice in Wonderland Syndrome a disorienting neurological condition, which manifests itself in impaired perception of one's own body, as well as other distortions in the perception of space and size. One of the characters Alice meets is the Mad Hatter. In the nineteenth century, hatters are known to really suffer from various diseases: memory loss, tremors, weakness, hallucinations - from mercury poisoning, which was used in the manufacture of hats Illustration by John Tanniel "The Amazing Wizard of Oz" Lyman Frank Baum, 1900 In Russia the book is known in the retelling of Alexander Volkov under the title "The Wizard of the Emerald City" After the tornado, Dorothy leaves her shelter and finds herself in another world. Perhaps this is easily explained by the fact that the food stored in the bunker deteriorated and became hallucinogenic. Soon Dorothy meets different characters on the way. The lion could actually be a person suffering from leprosy, which made his face look like a lion's and he was forced to go into social isolation. The Scarecrow, usually portrayed as a very skinny hero, may have had anorexia nervosa, and Lumberjack undoubtedly had severe arthritis. The Wicked Witch of the West was afraid of water - a sure sign of aquagenic urticaria, that is, a rare form of water allergy. "Pinocchio" Carlo Collodi, 1883 In Russia, the tale is known as "The Golden Key or the Adventures of Pinocchio" Pinocchio is a wooden puppet who wants to be "real boy. " This wish is granted, but whenever Pinocchio tells a lie, his nose starts to grow. It later returns to its original wooden state. Most likely, Collodi described epidermodysplasia verruciform, in which rough and thick growths appear on the human body that cannot be treated: new ones grow at the site of the removed wart, and as a result, the skin resembles the bark of a tree. Subsequently, these cells can become cancerous. Perhaps for the first time the disease just became noticeable on Pinocchio's nose. "The Princess and the Pea" Hans Christian Andersen, 1835 To find out if the princess is in front of her or some kind of impostor, the mistress of the house in this fairy tale decides to test with a pea. How could a girl feel like she was sleeping under all those mattresses on a pea? It is likely that she had fibromyalgia. This disease is characterized by increased sensitivity and sleep disturbances. Fibromyalgia is aggravated by the stressful situation the princess is in. "Peter Pan" James Matthew Barry, 1911 Peter Pan is a never-growing boy who embarks on a journey through the wizarding world with his girlfriend Wendy.Although this is an excellent starting point for a fairy tale plot, the described can also be interpreted as a delay in the emotional development of a man, often due to a weak attachment to his mother at an early age. In this story, the parents are not involved in Peter's life, and the dog plays the role of his "nanny". Psychologists use the term Peter Pan Syndrome to describe men who seem stuck in adolescence and have difficulty making decisions. The literature also uses the term "Wendy syndrome" to describe the behavior of women who take on almost maternal care for such men. "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn" Mark Twain, 1876 Huckleberry Finn is a character in several books by Mark Twain ("The Adventures of Tom Sawyer "," Huckleberry Finn "). Huck grows up with a wandering alcoholic father and refuses to go to school. Sometimes this sabotage of the school is also called Huckleberry Finn syndrome. In adulthood, this condition can lead to evasion of responsibility (similar to Peter Pan Syndrome) due to the lack of a caring adult in early childhood. An alternative interpretation is that Huck might have had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn next to the barrel where Huckleberry slept. The Adventures of Munchausen Stories by Erich Raspe Baron Munchausen, a German nobleman who fought in Russia, was known to be greatly exaggerated stories of their imaginary exploits. Munchhausen's syndrome is now called fake disorder in which a person exaggerates the symptoms of illness in order to undergo medical examination, treatment, attention or psychological support that he or she lacks, all of which illustrate the enriching relationship between literature and medicine. Our expanding medical knowledge can help us better understand what conditions writers have noticed in people over the centuries. 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