How The Process Of Sexual Arousal Occurs

How The Process Of Sexual Arousal Occurs
How The Process Of Sexual Arousal Occurs

Video: How The Process Of Sexual Arousal Occurs

Video: Understanding how Arousal Works 2022, December
Anonim

Why are some women enough fantasy or scent for sexual arousal, while others have to put a lot of effort in order to tune in to sex? Emily Nagoski, a sex education expert with 20 years of experience, associates this process with arousal and suppression systems that include "gas" and "brake". How they work, Nagoski told in her work “How a woman wants. Master class on the science of sex. T&R re-read the book and explained what the "dual control model" is, how arousal occurs and what factors affect it.

.disclamer {display: block; background-color: # f3f9f9; font-family: sans-serif; font-size: smaller; text-align: left; padding: 10px; }.disclamer1 {display: block; background-color: # FFE3E0; font-family: sans-serif; font-size: smaller; text-align: left; padding: 10px; }

Attention! "Adult" content intended for persons over the age of 18

.marker {background: # FFE3E0; background: linear-gradient (180deg, rgba (255,255,255,0) 45%, # FFE3E0 55%); }

As the woman wants. Sex Science Workshop

Emily Nagoski

Mann, Ivanov and Ferber Publishing, 2016

Dual control model

The dual control model was developed in the late 1990s by Eric Jansen and John Bancroft at the Kinsey Institute. It describes the stages of arousal (erection, hydration, etc.) and the mechanism itself that controls sexual arousal.

The central nervous system (brain and spine) consists of pairs, one of which is gas, the other is a brake. The dual control model suggests that the part of the brain that regulates sexual responses works in a similar way. This model has two parts:

The Sexual Arousal System (SES) is the gas pedal. The system receives information about the sexual stimulus from the environment through the senses. You hear a smell or touch something, it becomes a sexually arousal, which is communicated to the brain and then the genitals. The Sexual Suppression System (SIS) is the brake pedal. The system suppresses the reaction if it detects some kind of external threat, like a brake pedal in a car, reacting to the perceived stimulus.

The arousal system is in constant search for stimuli, while the suppression system looks for signals that suppress sexual desire. These include the risk of illness, unwanted pregnancy, and social consequences.

Emily Nagoski compares the second brake system to a hand brake in a car. Unlike “foot” brakes, manual brakes are most often associated with fear of failure or fear of not reaching orgasm. Various dysfunctions (disturbances in the work of sexual behavior) can be considered as an imbalance between the work of the brake and gas. “If you are having problems with any aspect of your sexual behavior, it may be that the gas is not getting a strong enough stimulus. Or too much stimulus comes to the brake,”explains Emily Nagoski.

Many are mistaken in assuming that the lack of sexual desire, problems with reaching orgasm are associated with poor gas work. However, the problem also lies in the brake, which often makes the excitation process difficult.

Storytel is an international audiobook subscription service. The Storytel library contains audiobooks of almost every genre, from classics and non-fixation to lectures, stand-ups and podcasts. This is a service that solves the reading problem. It lets you listen to audiobooks anytime, anywhere: while exercising, cooking, commuting, on the plane, before bed, and whenever you want. Storytel creates and records its own unique content - lecture projects, podcasts, audio series, and also collaborates with the best voices of the country.

What determines the ability to be aroused

According to the principles of the dual control model, arousal involves two processes: activation and deactivation. The level of sexual arousal depends on how strongly the mechanism is stimulated and how weakly it is suppressed. And here the sensitivity of the gas and the brake to the stimulation received is important.

SES and SIS systems are individual, they do not change much over the course of life and manifest themselves in completely different ways for each person. The sensitivity of SES and SIS is different for everyone, and, accordingly, the ability to sense arousal is very different. For most people, SES and SIS systems work at an average level. Deviations suggest an edge in one of these directions.

Let's assume that throttle and brake are highly sensitive. That is, SES is the most active and SIS is the least active. In this case, the person quickly reacts to various stimuli and neglects the possible risks. When excited, it becomes extremely difficult to manage this sensation, and the behavior can become intrusive and uncontrollable. People with this trait often feel sex drive. Moreover, in stressful situations, the desire to have sex increases. “2–6% of women have a sensitive arousal system and a weak brake, and this combination causes sexual behavior with an increased level of risk and a tendency to obsessive behavior,” the author notes.

There are also the opposite situations: the less active SES system and the most active SIS system. This category includes 1–4% of women. It is difficult for them to become aroused, sexual desire rarely arises, there is a quick reaction to factors that cause suppression of sexual desire. Therefore, it takes a lot of effort to tune in to sex.

Oversensitive suppression is a major cause of sexual problems

“In 2008, in a survey of 226 women aged 18 to 81, researchers found that low interest in sex, difficulty in achieving sexual arousal and orgasm correlated with the work of the suppression system, especially with 'conditioned arousal' and fears about sexual function (“If I worry that I will not be able to get aroused or reach orgasm for too long, it starts to suppress my arousal”)”, - gives the example of Nagoski.

SES and SIS are innate individual characteristics that do not change much over the course of life. However, you can develop this indicator within certain boundaries and gain relevant experience that affects the realization of the potential. Nagoski suggests that it is possible to change the factors that cause suppression or inhibition, for example, by reducing the risk of unwanted pregnancy or infection.

You can also change and increase your arousal factors, but first you need to understand what turns you on and minimize distractions. In any case, the SES and SIS systems respond exclusively to external factors, and none of these responses is innate. By understanding your desires, sexual characteristics, arousal or suppression factors, you are able to maximize your sexual potential.

Storytel is an international audiobook subscription service. The Storytel library contains audiobooks of almost every genre, from classics and non-fixation to lectures, stand-ups and podcasts. This is a service that solves the reading problem. It lets you listen to audiobooks anytime, anywhere: while exercising, cooking, commuting, on the plane, before bed, and whenever you want. Storytel creates and records its own unique content - lecture projects, podcasts, audio series, and also collaborates with the best voices of the country.

What turns you on

The ability to get excited about certain things is not innate. Nevertheless, Nagoski, after talking with different women, most often heard the following answers:

"Big beautiful bathroom in a hotel room"

"When my partner puts the kids to bed."

"Fanfiction about Harry Potter and Draco Malfoy"

"Fantasies about me having sex in plain sight"

"Sex in full view"

The dual control model explains how the brain responds to stimuli. He notices sexually positive stimuli (for example, an attractive partner) and potential threats (people around) and sends the appropriate signals.

Arousal is the process of activating reinforcing factors and turning off suppressive factors.

But the question of what the brain defines as a positive stimulus or threat is quite individual. There are no sexual stimuli that are unambiguously perceived from birth - their comprehension comes with experience. We learn about exciting and non-exciting stimuli from the cultural and social context, as well as through the study of our desires.

Finally

The brain has a gas pedal that responds to sexually stimulating factors; the brain has a brake that responds to possible threats. This includes a wide variety of factors, from fear of unwanted pregnancy to relationship problems, and there are no inherent sexually positive stimuli or threats. Arousal and suppressive systems learn how and to what to respond from our experience. Different people have different sensitivities of arousal and suppression systems.

In the Open Reading section, we publish excerpts from books as provided by publishers. Minor abbreviations are indicated by ellipsis in square brackets. The opinion of the author may not coincide with the opinion of the editorial board.

Popular by topic