WHO Recommends That Those Who Have Been Ill Get Vaccinated Against Coronavirus

WHO Recommends That Those Who Have Been Ill Get Vaccinated Against Coronavirus
WHO Recommends That Those Who Have Been Ill Get Vaccinated Against Coronavirus

Video: WHO Recommends That Those Who Have Been Ill Get Vaccinated Against Coronavirus

Video: COVID-19: Vaccines are safe for reproductive health | COVID-19 Special 2022, November
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Specialists of the World Health Organization (WHO) began to make the first statements regarding vaccination against coronavirus infection of people who have already had it.

Earlier, Dmitry Kulish, professor at the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, presented his point of view on this issue to Uralinformburo. He noted that he knows people who have already suffered the disease, and then received the vaccine - they all feel great and have a high titer of protective antibodies. In his opinion, such vaccination is a rather safe phenomenon.

Meanwhile, WHO stressed during a press conference in Geneva: the SAGE vaccination strategic group recommends offering the COVID-19 vaccine to all people, regardless of whether a person had an infection without symptoms or was seriously ill.

However, according to the experts of the organization, during the first six months after recovery, people most often do not fall ill again, so it makes sense to vaccinate those who have been ill only six months after the first illness. Moreover, the recommendation on a six-month delay was given solely for reasons of equitable distribution of vaccines in conditions of their acute shortage. "This [tactic] will encourage the use of vaccines for other people who have not been exposed to the virus, and thus provide protection for a much larger portion of the population," it said during a press conference.

At the same time, in a separate later released WHO document on the background of vaccine development, it is said that the protective titer of antibodies can persist in those who have been ill for longer. "A recent study using independent tests for the receptor binding domain (RBD) and NP has demonstrated that neutralizing antibodies to SARS-Cov-2 [the virus that causes COVID-19 disease] are stable 6-7 months after infection, even in patients with mild symptoms. It is not yet known how long these neutralizing antibodies will last, or what level of protection they will provide, "the document says. This may mean that vaccination for those who have been ill may need even later than six months later, especially given the fact that even with the disappearance of protective antibodies, T-cells (T-lymphocytes) can protect against the virus.

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