Zip For A Dollar: Australians Test Indoor COVID-19 Nasal Spray

Zip For A Dollar: Australians Test Indoor COVID-19 Nasal Spray
Zip For A Dollar: Australians Test Indoor COVID-19 Nasal Spray

Video: Zip For A Dollar: Australians Test Indoor COVID-19 Nasal Spray

Video: In-Depth: Block COVID-19 with a nasal spray 2022, December
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Australian virologists have begun testing a nasal spray that can be used before traveling on public transport, attending a performance or a restaurant. The research is sponsored by Stanford University. The new remedy is supposed to give the body protection from infection for several hours. As an active agent, the spray will include chicken antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. For more details, see the column of scientific observer Nikolai Grinko. Today, the largest pharmaceutical companies around the world are testing vaccines against COVID-19, periodically reporting success. But even if tomorrow they all confirm the effectiveness of their drugs and immediately launch them on the market, the epidemiological situation will not return to normal instantly. Therefore, many pharmaceutical companies have directed their research in the other direction: they are looking for a tool that can temporarily minimize the likelihood of transmission of the coronavirus. Human laboratory antibodies are expensive both in development and in production: for this, a huge number of cells have to be grown in bioreactors. It is much easier to obtain chicken antibodies; experts even call this technology unusually low-tech. Scientists inject the protein of the virus into the chicken's body, and its immune system generates a strong response. Antibodies - the so-called Y immunoglobulins - appear not only throughout the body, but even in the laid eggs to protect the offspring from possible infection. Researchers collect antibodies from the yolks and produce nasal drops from them. According to preliminary estimates, the dose of such a drug will cost no more than $ 1. A separate question is whether chicken antibodies to coronavirus will generally work in the human body as it should. The researchers say the chances of this are very high, and to be sure of this, they are testing on volunteers. The same will happen if it turns out that the drug does not stay in the nasal cavity for a long time, since the required protection time should be at least two to three hours. However, the authors of the study claim that they also have backup options: in parallel, studies of antibodies in rabbits and hamsters are being conducted. Ideally, the process should look like this: a person uses a nasal spray before being in a room with a large number of people, for example, before a movie show. For some time, his body can resist infecting at least that part of the viruses that are inhaled through the nose. After a couple of hours, the protection weakens, and the treatment can be repeated. According to scientists, such measures can, if not stop the pandemic, then at least greatly reduce the number of cases and significantly reduce the burden on hospitals. It is likely that even before the general vaccination of mankind, we will be able, albeit temporarily, to contain the spread of the virus with the help of new "low-tech" protective means. This means that we will be able to go to theaters, visit restaurants and even fly to other countries without restrictions. Although

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