What Is Scallop Syndrome And How To Deal With It?

What Is Scallop Syndrome And How To Deal With It?
What Is Scallop Syndrome And How To Deal With It?

Video: What Is Scallop Syndrome And How To Deal With It?

Video: 12 Impressive Health Benefits of Scallops 2022, December
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After recovering from the coronavirus, many patients suffer from postcoid syndrome. Mental disorders, apathy and suicidal thoughts are some of these complications. The syndrome is also known as Long Covid - a consequence of COVID-19, in which up to 20% of people who have had a coronavirus infection suffer from long-term symptoms lasting up to 12 weeks and 2.3% of cases longer. Postcoid syndrome is included in the International Classifier of Diseases ICD-10 in the wording "Post COVID-19 condition". People who have undergone coronavirus talked about how they are returning to normal life, the BBC Russian service reports. Those who have had the coronavirus say that exacerbation of any post-ovarian symptoms, including depression, occurs even months after the illness. Elena Preobrazhenskaya, a teacher from Saratov, fell ill with covid back in February: “In the summer I visited a sanatorium, and I felt better. Only mild shortness of breath, weakness and some anxiety remained. In September, I went to work, I became more tired. Shortness of breath and nervousness increased. I went on sick leave. I thought it was covid again, but it turned out to be complications on the nervous system. When I was on my way to the second CT scan, I was covered with a panic attack. While waiting for the result, my whole body was shaking, my hands were shaking,”she said. Ekaterina, director of a small IT company from Moscow, said that she wants to lie on the couch for days. The smallest domestic troubles cause a flood of tears and tremendous self-pity. “A fog appeared in my head and it became difficult to think. At the slightest exertion, the heart rate increased. Weakness, temperature 37.4, chills and causeless pain in the throat persisted - the postcoid period turned out to be much longer and more severe than the disease itself. Depression and suicidal thoughts soon added to these symptoms. Before the coronavirus, I was an absolutely healthy person. I have never had depression. In September, I had the usual ARVI and all the postcoid symptoms returned. I realized that I was no longer able to get out and went to a psychotherapist. He diagnosed me with a depressive disorder,”she says. Others interviewed also complained of lack of energy, apathy, and other psychological problems. Back in the spring of 2020, support groups began to be created on social networks around the world, organized by people who had had a mild or severe coronavirus infection and faced long-term symptoms. The participants supported each other and exchanged experiences. While there is no consensus in the medical community about "postcoid" manifestations, patients are faced with a lack of understanding on the part of doctors. Many of the doctors still do not take into account the specifics of complications and treat them like ordinary diseases, or do not see health problems at all. Unsuccessful attempts to get qualified help only exacerbate the panic mood of patients. According to some experts, special rehabilitation centers should be created for patients with long-term postcoid syndrome. The number of such patients is on average 10% of the total number of people who have recovered from acute coronavirus. Almost all of those surveyed now drink antidepressants or sedatives prescribed by doctors. They help smooth out emotional instability and even out mood. Simple monotonous exercises that develop fine motor skills and light walks in the fresh air help. It is also important to follow a normal daily routine.

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