Doctors Explain Exactly How Sleep Deprivation Prevents You From Losing Weight

Doctors Explain Exactly How Sleep Deprivation Prevents You From Losing Weight
Doctors Explain Exactly How Sleep Deprivation Prevents You From Losing Weight

Video: Doctors Explain Exactly How Sleep Deprivation Prevents You From Losing Weight

Video: Does Sleep Deprivation Lead to Weight Gain? 2022, December
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During the experiment, it turned out that even after a couple of nights of lack of sleep, people want more and more sweet and starchy foods.

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Dr. Eleanor Scott from the University of Leeds (UK) conducted an experiment that proved the relationship between sugar levels and sleep patterns, according to the British edition of the Daily Mail.

Dr. Michael Mosley explains how he took part in Dr. Scott's experiment.

They recruited a group of healthy volunteers and, under Scott's leadership, equipped them with activity monitors and continuous glucose monitors to see what was happening to their blood sugar.

We then asked our volunteers to sleep normally for two nights (so we had a baseline to work), they had two nights when they went to bed three hours later than usual, and then again two nights when they could sleep. as much as they wanted.

“I was unpleasantly surprised at how much my blood sugar went up on the days when I was sleep deprived, and how hungry it made me,” Mosley says. He also shares that one of the participants in the experiment, after a night of lack of sleep, wanted 10 cakes with cream for tomorrow, which was atypical for him.

All participants, regardless of whether they ate sweets or stayed on their usual diet, saw a marked increase in blood sugar levels to those of people with borderline type 2 diabetes. However, these problems were resolved after several nights of quality sleep.

Dr. Scott explained, “We know that when people are sleep deprived, they often crave sweet foods. We also know that if you stay awake at the right time, you make more of the stress hormone cortisol, which can affect your appetite as well as your glucose levels.”

Poor sleep also disrupts the production of hunger hormones leptin and ghrelin, Dr. Scott noted. They work together to control appetite. Leptin reduces hunger and ghrelin promotes hunger development.

Researchers from the University of Chicago recently monitored hunger and appetite hormones in a group of volunteers. In this study, volunteers were asked to sleep four hours a night for six nights, followed by six more nights when they could sleep as much as they wanted.

Trials showed that when they were sleep deprived, volunteers had 18 percent lower leptin levels and 28 percent higher ghrelin levels, and they also reported feeling much more hungry. Their preference for sweet, salty and flour products has increased especially markedly.

The bottom line is that if you want your hunger hormones to work with you and not against you, you must prioritize sleep, Dr.Michael Mosley concludes.

Photo: Vostock Photo

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